Search

what we like and why we like it

THE PAGES WE VISITED ARE AMONG THE MOST VISITED AND IMPORTANT TO FIRST AND LASTING IMPRESSIONS.

For each site visit we looked at key pages. For professional service firms, we viewed the homepage, a service area, industry page, a biography page and the firm’s repository of thought leadership. We also checked to see whether the site is mobile friendly. For associations, we reviewed the homepage, member and thought leadership pages and the about us page—plus the mobile view. Click the images to learn about the criteria for our reviews. You’ll learn what we like and why. Learn about our review methodology and read about our summary findings in the executive summary at the beginning of the legal, accountingconsulting and association reviews. Our criteria for overall site impression is here

Click images to read our review criteria
  • Green Ribbon

    green ribbon landing

criteria for our comments

what we like and why we like it

THE PAGES WE VISITED ARE AMONG THE MOST VISITED AND IMPORTANT TO FIRST AND LASTING IMPRESSIONS.

For each site visit we looked at key pages. For professional service firms, we viewed the homepage, a service area, industry page, a biography page and the firm’s repository of thought leadership. We also checked to see whether the site is mobile friendly. For associations, we reviewed the homepage, member and thought leadership pages and the about us page—plus the mobile view. Click the images to learn about the criteria for our reviews. You’ll learn what we like and why. Learn about our review methodology and read about our summary findings in the executive summary at the beginning of the legal, accountingconsulting and association reviews. Our criteria for overall site impression is herehere

methodology

digital impressions: how we chose and organized the sites

WHEN WE CONCEIVED SITE VISITS WE HAD NO IDEA HOW MUCH WORK WOULD BE INVOLVED.

Is it ever thus? Many worthwhile projects begin on a wing and a prayer. We chose five pages we wished to review for Site VisitsTM. That hasn’t changed. They are the homepage, a service description or membership page, the firm’s central repository for publications and a biography or about us page. We also checked to see whether the site is mobile friendly. Biographies were chosen randomly or according to some nonsensical rule—the first partner or director beginning with “S.”

How We Chose the Organizations

As for the sites themselves, we chose the largest, global 100 law firm sites as identified by The American Lawyer, the Top 50 accounting sites as identified by Accounting Today and the Vault 50 Prestige List for consulting firms. None of these lists was a slam dunk. Firms are merging all the time so the published lists fall out of date quickly. The consulting list will certainly cause some raised eyebrows. Consulting as a category presents a whole host of problems. The consulting firms we all know—Bain, McKinsey, Accenture and the Big Four—are easy to spot. So are many other firms in the management-consulting category. But consulting firms very quickly become aligned with a specific vertical, particularly IT but also every other industry vertical for which there is an SIC code. Creating it ourselves, we might have built the consulting list very differently; for example, we could pick the ten largest industries by revenue, then research the top management-consulting firms in each industry. O, my. We defaulted to the Vault list. Associations was just as tough. However, since Washington is home to 4,500 associations, we felt safe going with the DC-area’s Top 50.

Organized by Head Count

Of course, we have presented the firms alphabetically but we also wished to order them by size. Problem one: firms are growing and shedding employees daily. Therefore all of our rankings by size are going to be our best guess for the list at the time of publication. Problem two: we were challenged by giant firms like IBM. Their employee count is known but the specific number of IBM Consultants is nowhere we could find. We researched the Internet generally, Wikipedia, company annual reports, the company webpage and articles on the company. Finally, we called the company itself and even some of those could not provide the answers we sought! In the end, for consulting, we chose to go with overall employee head count.